Private Pilot

Obtaining a Private Pilot Certificate allows you to fly for your own leisure and carry passengers onboard an aircraft. It also provides the necessary foundation to complete higher-level courses. The private pilot certificate is typically the first “Pilot’s License” an aspiring pilot will obtain. This certificate enables you to act as Pilot in Command of an aircraft (typically single engine, however it is possible get a multi-engine certificate first).

It's never too late to become a private pilot. In fact, Your wings already exist, All you have to do is fly.

Privileges:

Carry passengers

Fly Day or Night

Travel any Distance

Must maintain certain visual requirements

Flight Experience

60 Hours of total flight time

50 Hours of flight training from an authorized instructor

10 Hours of solo flight

5 Hours solo cross-country (at least 50 NM)

150 NM solo cross-country with three full stops (one 50+ NM leg)

3 Takeoffs and 3 landings to a full stop (involving flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.

3 Hours of cross-country flight training

3 Hours of night flight training

100 NM total distance cross-country flight

10 Takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (each involving flight in the traffic pattern).

3 Hours of instrument training

3 Hours in preparation for the practical test within 60 days prior to the test date.

Pass FAA written examination

Pass FAA check ride

Requirements(General)

Ability to read, write and speak English

Ability to pass an FAA medical examination

16 years of age for solo flight

17 years of age for pilot license

Third class medical certificate

Ground School:

Jeppesen Training System

Jeppesen Deluxe 141 Kit

Additional Ground Training

Commercial Pilot

Like the instrument rating, a commercial certificate is beneficial for both career-oriented pilots as well as hobbyists. The commercial training refines a pilot’s skills, resulting in more precise flying. This inevitably adds an extra level of safety for the pilot and his / her passengers. Perhaps the greatest benefit of this certificate is the ability to fly for hire (receive compensation for flying).

Privileges

Fly for hire

Requirements(General)

Ability to read, write and speak English

Ability to pass an FAA medical examination/ Second class medical certificate

Age 18 or older to obtain certificate

250 hours of total flight time

Ground School:

Jeppesen Training System

Training videos are provided

Deluxe Jeppesen 141 Kit

Additional Ground Training

Additional Multi/ MEI training

Flight Experience

Hold a Private Pilot Certificate

250 Hours of total flight time

100 Hours as Pilot in Command

20 Hours of flight training from an authorized instructor

10 Hours of solo flight

5 Hours solo cross-country (at least 50 NM)

150 NM solo cross-country with three full stops (one 50+ NM leg)

3 Takeoffs and 3 landings to a full stop (involving flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.

3 Hours of cross-country flight training

3 Hours of night flight training

100 NM total distance cross-country flight

10 Takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (each involving flight in the traffic pattern.

3 Hours of instrument training

3 Hours in preparation for the practical test within 60 days prior to the test date.

Pass FAA written examination

Pass FAA check ride

Instrument Rating

This rating adds an unparalleled level of safety by sharpening a pilot’s proficiency and lessening the risks associated with unexpected adverse weather conditions. Instrument-rated pilots can fly and navigate in IFR weather conditions using just the instruments inside of an aircraft.

An Instrument Rating further refines your navigational and safety skills. Instrument-rated pilots can fly and navigate in IFR weather conditions using just the instruments inside of an aircraft.

Requirements:

17 years of age

Private Pilot license

Ground School:

Jeppesen Training System

Training videos are provided

Deluxe Jeppesen 141 Kit

Additional Ground Training

Privileges

Operate as Pilot in Command in instrument meteorological conditions (weather that is below required flight conditions for visual flight)

Requirements

50 Hours of cross country flight as pilot in command

40 Hours of actual or simulated instrument time

15 Hours of instrument flight training from an authorized instructor in the aircraft category for which the instrument rating is sought

3 Hours of preparation instruction within 60 days prior to the practical exam

Note: A maximum of 20 hours may be performed in a flight simulator or flight training device with an authorized instructor

IFR 250 NM cross country flight along airways or ATC-directed routing

Includes an instrument approach at each airport; and

Three different kinds of approaches with the use of navigation systems

Pass FAA written examination

Pass FAA check ride

Certified Flight Instructor (CFI)

The Federal Aviation Regulations require that candidates for pilot certificates, ratings or endorsements receive a certain amount of training, both in the air and on the ground, in order to obtain that certificate. CFIs are responsible for teaching pilots how to fly as well as ensuring that certificated pilots maintain their proficiency.

Privileges:

Provide required training for private pilot, commercial pilot and certified flight instructor candidates

Endorse private pilot, commercial pilot and certified flight instructor candidates to take FAA oral and practical exams

Provide required training and endorsements for pilots seeking complex and/or high performance endorsements

Conduct biennial flight reviews for certificated pilots

Requirements:

You must possess a commercial certificate in order to become a flight instructor. You must also successfully complete the Flight Instructor Airplane and Fundamentals of Instructing written examinations. The various requirements necessary to prepare a flight instructor candidate vary based on the individual’s level of experience. The following breakdown is a conservative estimate based on prior candidates, but please be aware that this is only an ESTIMATE:

Ground (20 – 25 Hours):

Ground lessons are a major component of flight instructor training. You and your instructor will cover everything set forth in the Certified Flight Instructor Practical Test Standards, which essentially requires you to learn how to teach everything set forth in the Private and Commercial Practical Test Standards. You are not only required to possess a solid understanding of all principles, but you must also be able to teach these principles to students, therefore this training will include curriculum planning.

Flight (Right Seat Experience 10 – 15 Hours; No Right Seat Experience 20 Hours)

The flight portion of this training directly relates to everything you discussed in your ground lessons. You will be required to fly all maneuvers from the right seat within the parameters set forth in the Practical Test Standards. You must also be able to clearly explain how to perform these maneuvers while doing so. The final flight portion of the Certified Flight Instructor training is the spin endorsement.

Certified Flight Instructor – Instrument (CFII)

The Federal Aviation Regulations require that candidates for pilot certificates, ratings or endorsements receive a certain amount of training, both in the air and on the ground, in order to obtain that certificate. CFIIs are responsible for teaching pilots how to fly in instrument conditions as well as ensuring that instrument rated pilots maintain their proficiency.

Privileges:

Provide required training for instrument rating candidates

Endorse instrument rating candidates to take FAA oral and practical exams

Conduct instrument proficiency checks for instrument rated pilots

Requirements:

You must possess a commercial certificate in order to become a Certified Flight Instructor Instrument. You must also pass the Flight Instructor Instrument written examination. The various requirements necessary to prepare an instrument instructor candidate vary based on the individual’s level of experience. The following breakdown is a conservative estimate based on prior candidates, but please be aware that this is an ESTIMATE for individuals who have already acquired their initial instructor rating:

Ground (10 Hours)

Ground lessons are a major component of flight instructor training. You and your instructor will cover everything set forth in the Certified Flight Instructor Instrument Practical Test Standards, which essentially requires you to learn how to teach everything set forth in the Instrument Rating Practical Test Standards. You are not only required to possess a solid understanding of all principles, but you must also be able to teach these principles to students, therefore this training will include curriculum planning.

Flight (10 Hours)

The flight portion of this training directly relates to everything you discussed in your ground lessons. You will be required to fly all maneuvers from the right seat within the parameters set forth in the Practical Test Standards. You must also be able to clearly explain how to perform these maneuvers while doing so.

Multi-Engine Instructor (MEI)

The Federal Aviation Regulations require that candidates for pilot certificates, ratings or endorsements receive a certain amount of training, both in the air and on the ground, in order to obtain that certificate. MEIs are responsible for teaching pilots how to fly multi-engine aircraft as well as ensuring that certificated pilots maintain their proficiency

Privileges

Provide required training for multi-engine rating candidates

Endorse multi-engine candidates to take FAA oral and practical exams

Conduct instrument proficiency checks for instrument rated pilots

Requirements (Part 61)

You must possess a commercial certificate in order to become a Multi Engine Instructor. The various requirements necessary to prepare a flight instructor candidate vary based on the individual’s level of experience. The following breakdown is a conservative estimate based on prior candidates, but please be aware that this is an ESTIMATE for individuals who have already acquired their initial instructor rating:

Ground (10 Hours)

Ground lessons are a major component of flight instructor training. You and your instructor will cover everything set forth in the Multi-Engine Instructor Practical Test Standards, which essentially requires you to learn how to teach everything set forth in the Multi-Engine Practical Test Standards. You are not only required to possess a solid understanding of all principles, but you must also be able to teach these principles to students, therefore this training will include curriculum planning.

Flight (10 Hours)

The flight portion of this training directly relates to everything you discussed in your ground lessons. You will be required to fly all maneuvers from the right seat within the parameters set forth in the Practical Test Standards. You must also be able to clearly explain how to perform these maneuvers while doing so.

Complex Endorsement

The complex endorsement is relatively easy to obtain, yet affords a pilot the ability to fly a wider range of aircraft. A complex aircraft is defined as any aircraft that possesses flaps, retractable landing gear and constant speed propeller(s). Unlike other certificates and ratings, the complex endorsement is conveyed solely by a Certified Flight Instructor.

Privileges:

Can operate aircraft with flaps, retractable landing gear and constant speed propeller(s)

Requirements:

The complex endorsement must be added to a certificate and therefore, the candidate must hold at least a private pilot certificate. There are no time requirements associated with a complex endorsement, but the candidate must exhibit complete competence in the operation of a complex aircraft. Upon the demonstration of proficiency, the Certified Flight Instructor will award the candidate the complex endorsement.

Airline Transport Pilot (ATP)

We have helped a number of pilots acquire an airline transport pilot certificate. The process of acquiring this certificate is highly individualized. If you are interested in preparing for an ATP certificate at Orange Wings Aviation Academy (OWA), please contact one of our locations for additional details.

Multi-Engine Rating Instruction

The multi-engine rating can be added on to a private or commercial certificate. The multiengine rating certifies the pilot to operate twin-engine aircraft. Whether your goal is to fly professionally or recreationally, the multiengine rating is the next step to improving your piloting skills.

Privileges

Act as Pilot-in-Command of a multiengine aircraft

Requirements (Part 61)

There are a number of maneuvers which multi-engine candidates must be proficient at, however, the only time requirement associated with the rating is three hours of preparation with an instructor for the FAA practical test.

Cost

The following is an estimated cost breakdown for an add-on multi-engine rating. The estimate was generated based on the time it takes the average student to obtain the rating. Please note that this breakdown is based on our Bedford rates (with the exception of the simulator charges) and will vary between locations. Additionally, this estimate should provide you with an idea of virtually all of the costs associated with obtaining this rating. We have established this estimate using a fairly conservative approach to avoid unexpected expenses. If you have questions regarding how our pricing differs from the pricing of our competitors please feel free to contact us!

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